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    Maximus

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    Andrew Collins article

    Post by Maximus on Wed Mar 04, 2015 7:32 pm

    http://www.andrewcollins.com/page/articles/cabrera.htm




    556 BCE - Panathenaic festivals in Athens
    Moreover during the Panathenaic festivals in Athens, whose beginning is before Plato’s time, paintings were shown on peplum showing parts of the story.




    latter half of the 5th century BC - Hellanicus of Lesbos - Contrary to what many people state, the Atlantis story was known before Plato wrote his books, since there are references to it in fragments of a lost poem by Hellanicus of Lesbos apparently written before the books of Plato.




    Philolaus (Greek: c. 470 – c. 385 BCE) was a Greek Pythagorean and Presocratic philosopher. He argued that at the foundation of everything is the part played by the limiting and limitless, which combine together in a harmony. He is also credited with originating the theory that the earth was not the center of the universe.

    Philolaus, a Pythagorean philosopher, sold to Plato. After buying these books, Plato started to write Timaeus




    Plato

    The story comes from an Egyptian priest in Sais

    He told it to Solon, when he visited Egypt about 150 years before Plato’s time

    If the story was known in Egypt, it is likely that Pythagoras, who was there around the time of Solon, knew it.

    Philolaus, a Pythagorean philosopher, sold to Plato. After buying these books, Plato started to write Timaeus

    The story is told in Plato’s book by an old man, age 80, named Critias junior. He claims that he received it from his grandfather, a relative of Solon, during some festival when he was ten years old.




    45 BCE - Diodorus Siculus

    The second voyage [by Augustin Calmet quoting Georg Hornius] involved the accidental discovery by Phoenicians of an island with `navigable rivers’ mentioned in the works of Diodorus Siculus.(5) The third and final voyage, we are informed, was that of Hercules, who gave his name to the legendary columns which marked the exit of the Mediterranean and the entrance to the Atlantic Ocean.

    In his work, Cabrera acknowledges that there was more than one Hercules in classical tradition, before going on to say:

    Certain however, it is, that Diodorus speaks of a Hercules who sailed round the world and who founded the city of Lecta in Septimania: but no writer has pointed out its situation (note 24).(6)

    I was stunned at reading these words since I knew that no other contemporary writer ever makes reference to this statement. More important, it is not to be found in the surviving volumes of Diodorus Siculus’ multi-volume work the Library. What Cabrera is here implying is that Hercules circumnavigated the world and on that journey founded `the city of Lecta’ in a place called Septimania. In the knowledge that Hercules was considered certain classical writers to have sailed to the islands of Hesperides, which I identify with the Greater Antilles, I wondered whether Septimania might have been synonymous with one of these islands. The name itself seemed important, for in Latin septi means seven or a seven-fold division while mania has echoes of manes or manium, meaning `ghosts’, `shades of the dead’, `the lower world’ or `bodily remains’. It is from this same Latin root that we derive the English word `mania’, as in madness. Thus Septimania might be translated as meaning the ‘seven-fold place of ghosts or shades of the dead’.

    This interpretation of the place-name was so close to the mythological concept of the Seven Caves that it seemed unlikely to be pure coincidence. Not only was it seen as the place of emergence of the first human beings, but it was also to here that, in Aztec tradition, Quetzalcoatl and his twin Xolotl retrieved the bones of those who had drowned at the end of the world age known as the Fourth Sun. These bones were crushed and mixed with ground maize in order to fashion the present human race. The only known representation of the Seven Caves, found in the Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca codex, shows bones and religious symbols of the ancestors scattered about its seven compartments, implying that it was looked on not just as a place of the dead but also as the place of the island’s original inhabitants.

    As we may plainly see, the short passage does not provide us with a reference to Hercules’ all-important sea-journey. Who `they’ might have been is open to conjecture. It could have been other contemporaries, such as Hornius, or more ancient sources now lost to us. All Calmet says is that Diodorus affirms that this Hercules of Gades, the Iberic port so crucial to Atlantic journeys, was considered to have founded the city of Alecta in `Septimaniæ’ (spelt `Septimania’ by Cabrera). Yet as Cabrera informs us `no writer has pointed out its situation’.(Cool

    A city called Alecta is not found in any other classical account, while the only known historical place called Septimania is a region which formed the border territory between the Moors of Spain and the Frankish Christians of south-west France from the eighth century onwards. However, it is not thought that the name predates this epoch.

    Cabrera seems clear that the Septimania mentioned by Calmet was encountered by Hercules during his circumnavigation of the world. This is confirmed a little later on in the book when Cabrera draws his own, quite staggering, conclusions in respect to the location of Septimania, for he says:

    Diodorus asserts that one Hercules navigated the whole circuit of the earth, and built the city of Alecta in Septimania. All these circumstances, in conjunction with what I have already stated, induce me, and will lead any erudite examiner to conclude, with every appearance of probability, that Hercules Tyrius was the progenitor of Votan, that Septimania is, beyond a doubt, the island of Atlantis, or Hispaniola, that the city of Alecta was Valum Votan, capital of the same island from whence Votan embarked his first colony to people the continent of America, and whither he departed for the countries on the old hemisphere.(9)

    Although much of what Cabrera has to say here might seem like pure conjecture, he has built up his case carefully before making these conclusions. Cabrera obviously believed Septimania to be cognate with Plato’s Atlantis, while Valum Votan and the city of Alecta were also seen to be synonymous.




    1552 - Bartolomé de las Casas




    Georg Hornius (1620-1670)

    Cabrera tells us that Calmet, himself quoting one Georg Hornius (1620-1670), said that there had been three Atlantic voyages to the Americas in ancient times. The first was made by the Atlantes, the peoples of Atlas, the hero-god ‘who gave his name to the Ocean and the islands Atlantides’.(4) They were most probably the Berbers (or Taureg), the sea-faring peoples of Morocco and Algeria who unquestionably reached the Canary Isles during the first millennium BC. The second voyage involved the accidental discovery by Phoenicians of an island with `navigable rivers’ mentioned in the works of Diodorus Siculus.(5) The third and final voyage, we are informed, was that of Hercules, who gave his name to the legendary columns which marked the exit of the Mediterranean and the entrance to the Atlantic Ocean.




    (r. 1682-1698) Francisco Nuñez de la Vega, Bishop of Chiapas

    His [Paul Felix Cabrera] knowledge of Votan was derived from the works of Nuñez de la Vega, Bishop of Chiapas, who possessed and subsequently burnt a codex pertaining to be a personal account of Votan’s odyssey




    Augustin Calmet (1672-1757)

    Calmet’s Three Voyages

    Presented above is the basic outline of Cabrera’s remarkable work. Yet he provides us with far more than simply an account of Votan’s odyssey. Constantly, he draws on the findings and statements of earlier historians who would seem to have embraced similar ideas regarding transatlantic journeys in ancient times. One such person was the French Benedictine exegete and learned scholar Augustin Calmet (1672-1757). He wrote a 23-volume dictionary of the Bible, published in stages between 1707 and 1716, as well a number of subsequent literary works translated into various different languages.

    Cabrera tells us that Calmet, himself quoting one Georg Hornius (1620-1670), said that there had been three Atlantic voyages to the Americas in ancient times. The first was made by the Atlantes, the peoples of Atlas, the hero-god ‘who gave his name to the Ocean and the islands Atlantides’.(4) They were most probably the Berbers (or Taureg), the sea-faring peoples of Morocco and Algeria who unquestionably reached the Canary Isles during the first millennium BC. The second voyage involved the accidental discovery by Phoenicians of an island with `navigable rivers’ mentioned in the works of Diodorus Siculus.(5) The third and final voyage, we are informed, was that of Hercules, who gave his name to the legendary columns which marked the exit of the Mediterranean and the entrance to the Atlantic Ocean.

    Returning to Cabrera’s account, we see that Note 24 provides us with a quote from Calmet regarding Hercules’ round-the-world voyage. The reference is in Latin and reads as follows:

    Non est ergo locus ambigendi, Herculem Gaditanum sive aliquem, ex posteris, vel saltem, quempiam ex Phoenicibus, cui par esset cognomen, ultra Gaditanum fretum excurrisse, narrant enim de Hercule totum ab illo orbis ambitum maritimo itinere decursum;cui etiam Diodorus Alectam Septimaniæ urbem conditam tribuit. (7)

    I sought a translation of this passage from Ann Deagon, Professor of Classical Languages Emerita at Guildford College, Greensboro, North Carolina. In her opinion it reads:

    There is not therefore room for doubting, that Hercules of Gades or someone of (his) descendants, or at least some one of the Phoenicians who had the same name made an excursion beyond the Strait of Gibraltar, for they say of Hercules that by him the whole circuit of the globe was traversed by sea passage. To him Diodorus even attributed the foundation of the city Alecta (in) Septimaniæ.

    As we may plainly see, the short passage does not provide us with a reference to Hercules’ all-important sea-journey. Who `they’ might have been is open to conjecture. It could have been other contemporaries, such as Hornius, or more ancient sources now lost to us. All Calmet says is that Diodorus affirms that this Hercules of Gades, the Iberic port so crucial to Atlantic journeys, was considered to have founded the city of Alecta in `Septimaniæ’ (spelt `Septimania’ by Cabrera). Yet as Cabrera informs us `no writer has pointed out its situation’.(Cool

    A city called Alecta is not found in any other classical account, while the only known historical place called Septimania is a region which formed the border territory between the Moors of Spain and the Frankish Christians of south-west France from the eighth century onwards. However, it is not thought that the name predates this epoch.

    Cabrera seems clear that the Septimania mentioned by Calmet was encountered by Hercules during his circumnavigation of the world. This is confirmed a little later on in the book when Cabrera draws his own, quite staggering, conclusions in respect to the location of Septimania, for he says:

    Diodorus asserts that one Hercules navigated the whole circuit of the earth, and built the city of Alecta in Septimania. All these circumstances, in conjunction with what I have already stated, induce me, and will lead any erudite examiner to conclude, with every appearance of probability, that Hercules Tyrius was the progenitor of Votan, that Septimania is, beyond a doubt, the island of Atlantis, or Hispaniola, that the city of Alecta was Valum Votan, capital of the same island from whence Votan embarked his first colony to people the continent of America, and whither he departed for the countries on the old hemisphere.(9)

    Although much of what Cabrera has to say here might seem like pure conjecture, he has built up his case carefully before making these conclusions. Cabrera obviously believed Septimania to be cognate with Plato’s Atlantis, while Valum Votan and the city of Alecta were also seen to be synonymous.




    1773 - Friar Ramon de Ordoñez y Aguilar

    His [Paul Felix Cabrera] knowledge of Votan was derived from the works of : Friar Ramon de Ordoñez y Aguilar, canon of the cathedral town of Ciudad-Réal in Chiapas.

    Since Cabrera was a friend of Ordoñez y Aguilar, his rendition of Votan’s journey is perhaps more accurate than later accounts by the Abbé Brasseur de Bourbourg, who in the 1850s featured his odyssey in a four-volume work on the myths and religion of Central America.

    On his arrival in the Yucatán, Votan is said to have founded Na-chan, the `city of the serpents’, which Ordoñez y Aguilar identified with the Maya cult centre of Palenque, even though it dates only to c. AD 600. Cabrera associated the place where Votan established his ruling dynasty with a legendary place named Amaguemecan, which he said conveyed the idea of a `place in the waters’. Since Ordoñez y Aguilar tells us that Votan’s place of landfall in the Yucatán was the Lagoon de Terminos, Amaguemecan might well have been the Isla de Terminos, the largest of the islands placed between the outer sea and the lagoon. Mesoamerican tradition speaks of it as being the place of landfall of the peoples known as the Olmec and Xicalanca, and the island as the site of the latter’s first city.




    1794 - Paul Felix Cabrera and Captain Don Antonio del Rio

    In 1794 Guatemalan doctor and scholar Paul Felix Cabrera proposed that Hispaniola was Atlantis as well as a mysterious Atlantic island called Septimania.

    book entitled TEATRO CRITICO AMERICANO; OR, A CRITICAL INVESTIGATION AND RESEARCH INTO THE HISTORY OF THE AMERICANS by Paul Felix Cabrera, a Guatemalan doctor and scholar of the city of New Guatemala. Although the work was composed as early as 1794, the manuscript was overlooked until its rediscovery, along with a detailed description of the ruins of the Maya city of Palenque executed by Captain Don Antonio del Rio, some years later. The two works were finally published in one combined volume by Henry Berthoud and Suttaby, Evance and Fox, both of London, in 1822.

    Cabrera sets out to prove that the Tzendal culture hero named Votan was either a Phoenician or Carthaginian mariner who sailed to the Americas 206 years before the first Punic war, providing a date of 470 BC (264 BC + 206 years). The erudite manner in which the author uses biblical, classical and native American sources to present his case is quite extraordinary.

    His knowledge of Votan was derived from the works of Nuñez de la Vega, Bishop of Chiapas, who possessed and subsequently burnt a codex pertaining to be a personal account of Votan’s odyssey, and Friar Ramon de Ordoñez y Aguilar, canon of the cathedral town of Ciudad-Réal in Chiapas. He had discovered the ruined city of Palenque at the base of the Tumbala Mountains in 1773, and had learnt of Votan’s story from Nuñez de la Vega. Since Cabrera was a friend of Ordoñez y Aguilar, his rendition of Votan’s journey is perhaps more accurate than later accounts by the Abbé Brasseur de Bourbourg, who in the 1850s featured his odyssey in a four-volume work on the myths and religion of Central America.

    In Cabrera’s opinion, Votan departed from his homeland called Valum Chivim, seen as Tripoli in Syria, and sailed via Gades in Spain and a location known as the `houses of the thirteen snakes’, identified as the Canary Isles,(2) to somewhere called Valum Votan. This Cabrera identified with the island of Hispaniola. From here Votan sailed on to the American mainland, taking with him seven families `in which he recognised "culebra", or snake origin’.(3)

    Cabrera tells us that Calmet, himself quoting one Georg Hornius (1620-1670), said that there had been three Atlantic voyages to the Americas in ancient times. The first was made by the Atlantes, the peoples of Atlas, the hero-god ‘who gave his name to the Ocean and the islands Atlantides’.(4) They were most probably the Berbers (or Taureg), the sea-faring peoples of Morocco and Algeria who unquestionably reached the Canary Isles during the first millennium BC. The second voyage involved the accidental discovery by Phoenicians of an island with `navigable rivers’ mentioned in the works of Diodorus Siculus.(5) The third and final voyage, we are informed, was that of Hercules, who gave his name to the legendary columns which marked the exit of the Mediterranean and the entrance to the Atlantic Ocean.

    In his work, Cabrera acknowledges that there was more than one Hercules in classical tradition, before going on to say:

    Certain however, it is, that Diodorus speaks of a Hercules who sailed round the world and who founded the city of Lecta in Septimania: but no writer has pointed out its situation (note 24).(6)

    I was stunned at reading these words since I knew that no other contemporary writer ever makes reference to this statement. More important, it is not to be found in the surviving volumes of Diodorus Siculus’ multi-volume work the Library. What Cabrera is here implying is that Hercules circumnavigated the world and on that journey founded `the city of Lecta’ in a place called Septimania. In the knowledge that Hercules was considered certain classical writers to have sailed to the islands of Hesperides, which I identify with the Greater Antilles, I wondered whether Septimania might have been synonymous with one of these islands. The name itself seemed important, for in Latin septi means seven or a seven-fold division while mania has echoes of manes or manium, meaning `ghosts’, `shades of the dead’, `the lower world’ or `bodily remains’. It is from this same Latin root that we derive the English word `mania’, as in madness. Thus Septimania might be translated as meaning the ‘seven-fold place of ghosts or shades of the dead’.

    This interpretation of the place-name was so close to the mythological concept of the Seven Caves that it seemed unlikely to be pure coincidence. Not only was it seen as the place of emergence of the first human beings, but it was also to here that, in Aztec tradition, Quetzalcoatl and his twin Xolotl retrieved the bones of those who had drowned at the end of the world age known as the Fourth Sun. These bones were crushed and mixed with ground maize in order to fashion the present human race. The only known representation of the Seven Caves, found in the Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca codex, shows bones and religious symbols of the ancestors scattered about its seven compartments, implying that it was looked on not just as a place of the dead but also as the place of the island’s original inhabitants.

    Returning to Cabrera’s account, we see that Note 24 provides us with a quote from Calmet regarding Hercules’ round-the-world voyage. The reference is in Latin and reads as follows:

    Non est ergo locus ambigendi, Herculem Gaditanum sive aliquem, ex posteris, vel saltem, quempiam ex Phoenicibus, cui par esset cognomen, ultra Gaditanum fretum excurrisse, narrant enim de Hercule totum ab illo orbis ambitum maritimo itinere decursum;cui etiam Diodorus Alectam Septimaniæ urbem conditam tribuit. (7)

    I sought a translation of this passage from Ann Deagon, Professor of Classical Languages Emerita at Guildford College, Greensboro, North Carolina. In her opinion it reads:

    There is not therefore room for doubting, that Hercules of Gades or someone of (his) descendants, or at least some one of the Phoenicians who had the same name made an excursion beyond the Strait of Gibraltar, for they say of Hercules that by him the whole circuit of the globe was traversed by sea passage. To him Diodorus even attributed the foundation of the city Alecta (in) Septimaniæ.

    As we may plainly see, the short passage does not provide us with a reference to Hercules’ all-important sea-journey. Who `they’ might have been is open to conjecture. It could have been other contemporaries, such as Hornius, or more ancient sources now lost to us. All Calmet says is that Diodorus affirms that this Hercules of Gades, the Iberic port so crucial to Atlantic journeys, was considered to have founded the city of Alecta in `Septimaniæ’ (spelt `Septimania’ by Cabrera). Yet as Cabrera informs us `no writer has pointed out its situation’.(Cool

    A city called Alecta is not found in any other classical account, while the only known historical place called Septimania is a region which formed the border territory between the Moors of Spain and the Frankish Christians of south-west France from the eighth century onwards. However, it is not thought that the name predates this epoch.

    Cabrera seems clear that the Septimania mentioned by Calmet was encountered by Hercules during his circumnavigation of the world. This is confirmed a little later on in the book when Cabrera draws his own, quite staggering, conclusions in respect to the location of Septimania, for he says:

    Diodorus asserts that one Hercules navigated the whole circuit of the earth, and built the city of Alecta in Septimania. All these circumstances, in conjunction with what I have already stated, induce me, and will lead any erudite examiner to conclude, with every appearance of probability, that Hercules Tyrius was the progenitor of Votan, that Septimania is, beyond a doubt, the island of Atlantis, or Hispaniola, that the city of Alecta was Valum Votan, capital of the same island from whence Votan embarked his first colony to people the continent of America, and whither he departed for the countries on the old hemisphere.(9)

    Although much of what Cabrera has to say here might seem like pure conjecture, he has built up his case carefully before making these conclusions. Cabrera obviously believed Septimania to be cognate with Plato’s Atlantis, while Valum Votan and the city of Alecta were also seen to be synonymous.

    Cabrera considered it to have been Hispaniola. What led him to make this choice?

    He states why in the next paragraph:

    I am confirmed in my selection of this island from among the many dispersed throughout the Atlantic, not only on account of its position and magnitude exceeding all the others, but also, from its fertility and numerous navigable rivers, and chiefly from its having been the island of the Olmeca nations.(10)

    These then are his reasons for choosing Hispaniola as the site of Plato’s Atlantis.

    Cabrera’s last reason for singling out Hispaniola as the all-important island of Atlantis is that it was the `island of the Olmeca nations’. He goes on to explain that:

    In the Mexican tradition, which has been adopted by many eminent authors, (Siguenza, and Botutini among others), it was considered certain, that the Olmecas arrived at this island from the eastward, and crossed from thence to the continent. Botutini, however, is of opinion, that when the Olmecas were driven from their country, they proceeded to the Antilles Island and thence to the southern part of America.(13)

    Cabrera infers here that the Olmec, one of the earliest peoples to inhabit Mexico, arrived in the Greater Antilles from the east (i.e. across the Atlantic); the first time I had read such a statement. Yet other similar traditions speak clearly of Cuba being the original homeland of the earliest Mesoamerican peoples. In his History of de Nuestra Señora de Izamal, the Spanish historian Lizana included a detailed look at the early history of the Yucatán. He collected memories which suggested that the earliest inhabitants of the peninsula had come originally from Cuba, where they had settled after leaving Haiti.

    If Cabrera was right to conclude that Septimania was an Atlantic island visited by Hercules of Gades during his global circumnavigation, as well as both Atlantis and Valum Votan, it would seem that some knowledge of the island’s seven-fold symbolism really was carried back to the ancient world by Iberian Phoenicians. It is my supposition that this was equally so among their trading rivals and successors the Carthaginians of North Africa. Through the Moors these abstract ideas resurfaced in medieval Europe as the Island of the Seven Cities, or Antilia, which is simply another name for Atlantis.

    Cabrera’s work is important in that it provides us with further evidence of transatlantic voyages in ancient times and confirmation of the true location of Atlantis.




    1850s - Abbé Brasseur de Bourbourg

    it has long been argued that Plato’s Atlantic island was one of the West Indies. For example, in the mid nineteenth century French philologist and language scholar the Abbé Brasseur de Bourbourg attempted to demonstrate that Hispaniola was a surviving portion of a much greater Atlantean landmass

    Abbé Brasseur de Bourbourg, who in the 1850s featured his odyssey in a four-volume work on the myths and religion of Central America.

    Abbé Brasseur de Bourbourg believed that Hispaniola was the surviving portion of an Atlantean continent, which once extended out towards the African continent, and why in 1885 Hyde Clarke concluded that `the head seat of the great king [of Atlantis] was possibly in the Caribbean Sea; it may be in St Domingo’.(17)




    1885 - Hyde Clarke

    while in 1885 American historian Hyde Clarke proposed that `the head seat of the great king [of Atlantis] was possibly in the Caribbean Sea; it may be in St Domingo [i.e. Hispaniola]’.(1)

    Abbé Brasseur de Bourbourg believed that Hispaniola was the surviving portion of an Atlantean continent, which once extended out towards the African continent, and why in 1885 Hyde Clarke concluded that `the head seat of the great king [of Atlantis] was possibly in the Caribbean Sea; it may be in St Domingo’.(17)




    2000 - Andrew Collins

    Reports: GATEWAY TO ATLANTIS demonstrates that the core source material behind the Platonic Atlantean tradition originated in the Caribbean and was transmitted to the Mediterranean world by Iberic-Phoenician and Carthaginian seafarers. In complete secrecy these nations had been trading with the Americas, probably in concert with Berber peoples from northwest Africa, for hundreds of years prior to Plato’s age. There is ample evidence to this effect in the accounts of Atlantic journeys recorded by classical writers, as well as from the discovery of artefacts and inscribes stones in the Americas and the presence of tobacco and cocaine in Egyptian mummies. The discovery of Roman wrecks off the coasts of Brazil and Honduras helps support the notion that after the fall of the Carthaginian Empire in 146 BC the Romans gained knowledge of these transatlantic sea passages and exploited them for their own purposes. To some readers these ideas might seem like astounding revelations. Yet it is clear that ever since the `discovery’ of the Americas by Christopher Columbus in 1492 certain open-minded scholars have attempted to demonstrate almost exactly the same thing.

    In Cabrera’s opinion, Votan departed from his homeland called Valum Chivim, seen as Tripoli in Syria, and sailed via Gades in Spain and a location known as the `houses of the thirteen snakes’, identified as the Canary Isles,(2) to somewhere called Valum Votan. This Cabrera identified with the island of Hispaniola. From here Votan sailed on to the American mainland, taking with him seven families `in which he recognised "culebra", or snake origin’.(3) This last statement was news to me as I have argued in GATEWAY TO ATLANTIS that Valum Votan was the original homeland of the Mesoamerican peoples, where the ancestors of the seven (sometimes eight or thirteen) clans, or tribes, emerged from a mythical location known as the Seven Caves. This tradition was sometimes altered to suggest that the seven tribes or clans lived in seven cities before their departure from an island homeland known variously as Aztlan, Tulan or Tlapallan. I suggest that Votan belonged to the Hebrew giant race known as Nephilim, the sons of the Serpent, since Votan referred to himself as `snake’, or a `son of the serpent’, an expression that confirmed his so-called chivim lineage. The Hebrew word chivim means `sons of the female serpent’, identified as Eve (Astarte in Canaanite tradition), the legendary progenitor of the Nephilim. Furthermore, I have suggested that, `accompanied by representatives of the different clans or tribes from the island’, Votan and his Nephilim cohorts left Valum Votan bound for the Yucatec coast.

    In GATEWAY TO ATLANTIS I propose that it was knowledge of the Seven Caves/seven cities/seven tribes tradition which was transmitted back to the Mediterranean world by Iberic Phoenicians and Carthaginians (perhaps working in concert with Berber tribesmen). This knowledge was reintroduced to medieval Spain and Portugal by the Moors (the mixed Berber-Arab peoples of Morocco) as the concept of Antilia, the Island of the Seven Cities. The American geographer William H. Babcock made a study of fifteenth-century maps which showed this island and came to the conclusion that it was Cuba, an opinion accepted by L. Sprague le Camp in his important work LOST CONTINENTS. It can be demonstrated that the place-name Antilia is derived from the Semitic root ATL, `to raise’ or `to elevate’ (the Carthaginian ATLA), from which we get Atlas, Atlantic and, of course, Atlantis.




    2013 - Professor Emilio Spedicato

    Although the view that Hispaniola was ancient Atlantis has been given a boost again recently by Professor Emilio Spedicato of Bergamo University, I argue that the island of Atlantis described in Plato’s Timaeus and Critias is the neighbouring island of Cuba (see the TRUE LOCATION section of the website). Even Emilio, after reading GATEWAY TO ATLANTIS, has admitted that Cuba is `a very good candidate’ for the title of Atlantis. He further adds that `only archaeological work will perhaps solve the riddle.’

      Current date/time is Mon Nov 20, 2017 6:29 am