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    iliketoplaywithexcrement

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    Join date : 2014-04-30

    Don't stretch

    Post by iliketoplaywithexcrement on Mon Aug 04, 2014 9:15 pm





    [size=37]Quite a Stretch[/size]
    Stretching science shows that a stretching habit isn’t doing much of what people hope
    12,000 words, published 2000, updated Jul 9th, 2014
    by Paul Ingraham, Vancouver, Canada


     
     audio version available info

    SHOW SUMMARY

    Stretching is a comfortable and reassuring ritual for many people — it’s simple, it feels good, and it seems to promise easy benefits. For countless more, athletes and couch potatoes alike, stretching weighs on their conscience — one more thing they are supposed to find the time to do, like cooking more meals, or reading Anna Karenina. Can all these people be barking up the wrong tree? Sure they can! And they are.
    I stretch regularly. My personal favourites: hamstrings, hip flexors, neck, chest, lumbar muscles, and the deep gluteal muscles. But I don’t believe it’s doing much for me. I am as stiff and inflexible as I have ever been!


    Why is it that many Kenyans don’t stretch? Why was legendary coach Arthur Lydiard not a fan of stretching? Why does Galloway say, “In my experience runners who stretch are injured more often, and when they stop stretching, the injuries often go away”?
    — Bob Cooper, Runner’s World Magazine[size=12]1
    [/size]

    What a sensible article, and about time somebody exploded the stretching myth! I remember as a schoolboy in South Africa forty years ago always being told to run slowly to warm up for our various rugby, cricket, and soccer games — nobody ever told us to stretch, and over the past ten or so years I’ve been puzzled to see this come in as dogma. As a runner of marathons for years and a GP with injured patients, I’ve never been able to figure out how on earth stretching the heck out of muscles, ligaments, and nerves could (a) warm them up or (b) do the slightest bit of good, and have sometimes been given “the jaundiced eye” when I’ve suggested such to my patients.
    — Peter Houghton, MD, Vancouver (reader feedback)

    I am a soccer referee, and mostly by happy accident began substituting what you call “mobilizing” for various stretches prior to my matches, and I find this does an excellent job of stimulating the muscles, whereas after only stretching I still seem to be tight for the first several minutes. Then I read this article, which corroborates what I have found in practice!
    — Carlos Di Stefano, soccer referee (reader feedback)

    There is no “truth” about stretching
    The truth about stretching is that there is no truth about stretching to be had: it’s just too complicated a subject. There are too many mysteries and variables in muscle and connective tissue physiology, too many different stretching methods, and too many and vague goals for it to ever be possible to categorically say that stretching does or does not “work.” What kind of stretching, and for what? For every answer about stretching there are ten more questions — kind of like Lost — and for every safe assumption there’s a selection of exceptions.
    However, plentiful recent research now shows that stretching as we know it — the kind of typical stretching that the average person does at the gym, or even the kind of stretching that most athletes do — is mostly a waste of time for most commonly identified goals. For instance, articles published in recent years, reviewing hundreds of studies, have concluded that there isn’t much evidence that any widely practiced form of stretching prevents injury or muscle soreness23 — arguably the single most common goal of stretching. Adding significantly to the credibility of those reviews, a major year 2000 clinical study of many hundreds of soldiers showed no sign of benefit from and even some risks to stretching.4 Some of this evidence, and similar evidence, is nicely summarized in a recent segment of a CBC Radio One science show (see Exorcizing Myths about Exercise).
    About footnotes. There are many footnotes in this document. Click to make them “pop up” without losing your place. There are two types: interesting extra content, and boring reference information.1




    2


     Try one!
    Trainers, coaches and health care professionals are starting to insist on making recommendations based on evidence, or at least on a really convincing physiological rationale … and stretching just has not held up well under that pressure. Nor is it even a new idea that stretching might not be all that helpful. Consider this 31-year-old passage from an excellent 1983 Sports Illustrated article about David Moorcroft, a British middle and long distance runner and 5,000 metres world record holder:5

    Stacked in a corner of Anderson’s [Moorcroft’s coach] office are bundles of scientific papers. “I’ve tried to interpret the findings of the best physiologists and translate them into sound practices,” says Anderson. “That’s made me a radical. We’ve turned some coaching sacred cows on their ear.”
    For one, Anderson dismisses the stretching that most runners do. “It’s rubbish,” he says. “The received idea that by touching your toes you lengthen the fibers in your hamstrings is wrong. Soft tissue stretching like that is a learned skill and doesn’t carry over into running. Dave requires flexibility, and joint mobility, but running fast is the right kind of stretching for him.”
    The world-record holder mutely demonstrates his suppleness by reaching toward his toes. His fingertips get down to about midshin.
    'What Made Him Go So Wonderfully Mad?' So Inquired a friend of David Moorcroft after the Briton broke the world 5,000 record in an amazing performance, Moore (sportsillustrated.cnn.com)

    So why are people stretching?

    Continued
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    Maximus

    Posts : 1346
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    Age : 34
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    Re: Don't stretch

    Post by Maximus on Tue Aug 05, 2014 3:39 pm

    iliketoplaywithexcrement wrote:
    [size=22]I am a soccer referee, and mostly by happy accident began substituting what you call “mobilizing” for various stretches prior to my matches, and I find this does an excellent job of stimulating the muscles, whereas after only stretching I still seem to be tight for the first several minutes. Then I read this article, which corroborates what I have found in practice!

    Awesome. That's fascinating. The head huncho at Gracie Academy, Maxwell, in Philly said the same thing in his "joint-mobility" series. He was criticizing Jiu-jitsans who've become super-flexible with yogic-like stretching and what-not, saying they're flexible, but aren't that much stronger; saying they're actually weaker than someone who's incorporated dynamic movements into their warmups, rather than pure stretching alone.



    Mobilization, or joint-mobility, dynamic-stretching, or whatever you want to call it, stimulates the synovial fluid in your joints, supposedly helping towards injury prevention.

      Current date/time is Mon Sep 25, 2017 3:01 am